Ode to Sue Wild Wacky Wonderful Women

My sister-in-law (my husband’s sister) Sue passed away yesterday, after a drawn out battle with cancer. Leaving all of us crushed, but especially leaving her gorgeous husband Gavin and their 3 beautiful sons.

Sue was an amazing, Wild Wacky and Supremely Wonderful Woman.

Not because of how kind, caring and loving she was, but because of her outlook on life.

You see, other than the challengers that cancer brings to one’s life, Sue also had an ABI. ABI? I hear you ask… an Acquired Brain Injury.

She was in a horrendous car crash when she was about 19.

Sue has gone through life without being able to speak properly, and she was sometimes very difficult to understand. She didn’t walk well, because of the fractures in her pelvis and legs, one leg was 50mm
(2 inches) shorter than the other. So she sort of limped and shuffled when she walked about.

Her short-term memory was always a bit dodgy and you’d have to occasionally remind her of what you were chatting about.

She had poor coordination, and used to laugh infectiously at her own clumsiness. She had clawed toes on her left foot. All the result of her ABI.

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Natalie Shepard
Wild Wacky Wonderful Women

Let’s just say, Sue’s life wasn’t easy, as you can imagine. It was bloody tough. And there were days I suspect, early on when I’m sure she wished it were over.

But she never gave up.

She met Gav, had 3 fabulous kids, even though she’d been told she’d never be able to have children, and she forged a fabulous life for herself and her family.

Sue became an educator. Educating kids in schools through out Victoria about the perils of driving too fast, or getting in the car with someone that you shouldn’t. She relished, being able to make a difference and loved contributing to something beyond herself. Kids took notice and connected with this feisty woman, who struggled to be understood and walked in such a funny way.

I know this sounds a bit like her eulogy. Forgive me for that.

But when she left us last night at 7.20pm, I thought that this is a woman I wish I had of known better. This is a woman with an enormous depth of character and spirit.

I want her legacy to be far reaching.
I wanted you to know about her.

Arthur Ashes’s, quote above is apt. But I’m going to add some words of my own, that I think I can hear Sue whispering quietly to me.

Start where you are. Stop Waiting.
Use what you have. Stop Waiting.
Do what you can. Stop Waiting.

You are an amazing Wild Wacky Wonderful Woman. No excuses.

Get out there and start where you are, use what you have - your talents, strengths and abilities and do what you can.

Be amazing.

Sending you love and abundant blessings.

Nat (and Sandra)

xx

Wild Wacky Wonderful Women Founders

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Ode to Sue Wild Wacky Wonderful Women

My sister-in-law (my husband’s sister) Sue passed away yesterday, after a drawn out battle with cancer. Leaving all of us crushed, but especially leaving her gorgeous husband Gavin and their 3 beautiful sons.

Sue was an amazing, Wild Wacky and Supremely Wonderful Woman.

Not because of how kind, caring and loving she was, but because of her outlook on life.

You see, other than the challengers that cancer brings to one’s life, Sue also had an ABI. ABI? I hear you ask… an Acquired Brain Injury.

She was in a horrendous car crash when she was about 19.

Sue has gone through life without being able to speak properly, and she was sometimes very difficult to understand. She didn’t walk well, because of the fractures in her pelvis and legs, one leg was 50mm
(2 inches) shorter than the other. So she sort of limped and shuffled when she walked about.

Her short-term memory was always a bit dodgy and you’d have to occasionally remind her of what you were chatting about.

She had poor coordination, and used to laugh infectiously at her own clumsiness. She had clawed toes on her left foot. All the result of her ABI.

Let’s just say, Sue’s life wasn’t easy, as you can imagine. It was bloody tough. And there were days I suspect, early on when I’m sure she wished it were over.

But she never gave up.

She met Gav, had 3 fabulous kids, even though she’d been told she’d never be able to have children, and she forged a fabulous life for herself and her family.

Sue became an educator. Educating kids in schools through out Victoria about the perils of driving too fast, or getting in the car with someone that you shouldn’t. She relished, being able to make a difference and loved contributing to something beyond herself. Kids took notice and connected with this feisty woman, who struggled to be understood and walked in such a funny way.

I know this sounds a bit like her eulogy. Forgive me for that.

But when she left us last night at 7.20pm, I thought that this is a woman I wish I had of known better. This is a woman with an enormous depth of character and spirit.

I want her legacy to be far reaching.
I wanted you to know about her.

Arthur Ashes’s, quote above is apt. But I’m going to add some words of my own, that I think I can hear Sue whispering quietly to me.

Start where you are. Stop Waiting.
Use what you have. Stop Waiting.
Do what you can. Stop Waiting.

You are an amazing Wild Wacky Wonderful Woman. No excuses.

Get out there and start where you are, use what you have - your talents, strengths and abilities and do what you can.

Be amazing.

Sending you love and abundant blessings.

Nat (and Sandra)

xx

Wild Wacky Wonderful Women Founders

Contact Us Today

Sign up for Updates

Natalie Shepard
Wild Wacky Wonderful Women

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